H

History

  • Pechy
  • Pechy
  • Pechy
  • Pechy
  • Pechy
  • Pechy

The village of Hermanovce is located in midst of a beautiful, natural scenery, 20 km from Prešov and 60 km from the High Tatras. Hermanovce was referred by letters around 1300 a.C. for the first time as “Villa Hermani Superior et Inferior”, and the village continuously changed its owners. Both villages joined together when they belonged to the Péchy de Péchujfalu family as late as in the 18th century. Their noble title dates back to 1555, awarded by King Ferdinand I. (1503-1564), brother of the famous Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor. After the occupation by Turks, several family members had moved from the southern to the eastern region of the Hungarian territory, which is nowadays Slovakia. Their major estate was Pečovská Nová Ves and vicinity. They gained their estate in Hermanovce through the marriage with a daughter of the gentry family of Stanko.

The romantic story of Péchy Castle started around 1772, when Ladislaus Péchy, royal secret advisor during the reign of Empress Maria Theresa, and his wife Žofia Úsz were landlords and patrons of Hermanovce. The history of their son Franciscus Péchy, who was an imperial commissioner and ruled over the nearby villages, is remembered as a story of great love: When Franciscus proposed for the hand of a noble daughter from the town of Bardejov, Barbora Bereczky, he got the answer that she would love to become his wife, if he builds her a new manor house on the hill. The wish of beloved Barbora had been fulfilled and she rewarded her husband and village by building a beautiful church with a main altar from the school of Master Paul opposite the manor house. In 1818, she ordered to build a mausoleum with six pillars and stone dome in front of the main entrance of this church – it houses their coffins until today. The three-hectare English park with French garden in front of the manor house was established around 1830. Péchy Castle and its English park are declared as historic monuments and thus protected as part of the country’s historical heritage.

Péchy Castle, manor yard, distillery, vast forests and arable land were owned by George Péchy de Péchujfalu (Péchujfalusi Péchy György) until 1945 - he has built the Hunting Lodge, a tennis court next to the manor house and a swimming pool near by the creek for his family and relatives from Budapest who enjoyed their holidays in the country. At the end of the 2nd World War, Russian soldiers kidnapped him to Russia when the front passed the region towards Donbass, where he died in a camp. His wife Klára, née Bánó de Tapolylucska et Kükemezö lived in one room of the manor house with their daughter Klára until 1948. Under the Communist regime, the buildings were used as schools, but over time they became ruins. In the 1990s, the descendants were given back part of the original property and took on the task of life to save the family heritage – park, houses and forests.

Today, the manor house is owned by the followers of the Péchy family: Klára Szakall von Losoncz is the grand-daughter of the last owners.